Oh! My Vinyl!!!

SALE on 7” and 12” Singles

At Mabu Vinyl

Fresh Batches have arrived…!!

– House, Techno and Dance, etc….

–  All Genres

– Plenty Of Picture Sleeves

– Two Listening Facilities Available

Where??

Mabu Vinyl, 2 Rheede Street, Gardens, Cape Town

When???

Saturday 1st July – starts 1pm, all afternoon….!!!!

See you there…!!!!

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Vinyl sales hit a 25-year high: John Maytham talks to Stephen “Sugar” Segerman

http://www.capetalk.co.za/articles/239026/vinyl-sales-hits-a-25-year-high

Deloitte expects double-digit growth in the sales of vinyl records for the seventh consecutive year, passing the $1 billion mark for the first time since the 1980s.

The professional services company expects 12-inch records to generate between 15% and 18% of all physical music sales.

According to the Entertainment Retailers Association, vinyl outsold digital downloads for the first time in December.

Consumers bought 3.2 million LPs in 2015 – a 25-year high.

John Maytham interviewed Mabu Vinyl’s Stephen Segerman.

Listen to the interview in the audio below (and/or scroll down for quotes from it).

Vinyl sales hits a 25-year high
VINYL SALES HITS A 25-YEAR HIGH
Deloitte expects double-digit growth in the sales of vinyl records for the seventh consecutive year, passing the $1 billion mark for the first time since the 1980s.

Musica has a full vinyl section now.

Stephen Segerman, Mabu Vinyl

New vinyl is a bit pricy.

Stephen Segerman, Mabu Vinyl

The market big.

Stephen Segerman, Mabu Vinyl

It’s much more expensive to buy a vinyl record than to digitally download an album.

Stephen Segerman, Mabu Vinyl

Record Store Day – Cape Town, 16th April 2016

Record Store Day 2016

Record Store Day is an annual event, founded in 2007, held on the third Saturday of April each year to celebrate the culture of the independently owned record store. The day brings together fans, artists, and thousands of independent record stores across the world” . We are creating an area that allows our customers to celebrate what is vinyl & music. I have asked the finest record stores in Cape Town to take part in this collaboration.

Loads of vinyl / Hifi promos

DJ / Live Music / Open mic

Food / Beers / Wine / Coffee

https://www.facebook.com/events/1725608917652411/

Sipho Hotstix Mabuse to celebrate Burnout with his show “Timelessness 50 years on” Wed 1 Oct Lyric Theatre

TIMELESSNESS 50 years on 

On Wednesday evening, 1 October, for one-night-only, one of South Africa’s, and indeed the world’s, most admired and respected musicians – Sipho “Hotstix” Mabuse – is set to perform at The Lyric Theatre, Johannesburg, in a special, single performance, affair.

Titled Timelessness, a name coined by Mabuse, the show will  tip its hat to the masters, taking fans on musical journey filled with extraordinary, one-of-a-kind, performances.

2014 is a momentous year in Mabuse’s 50-year career immersion in music. Not only is it his golden anniversary of his unwavering commitment and contribution to South African music, it is 30 years ago his now 500 000 copy-selling single “Burn Out” changed the face of shape of Afro-pop and township jive like no other song or artist in pop music history.

Timelessness

From his first group, Harari, through to his stellar solo career that spans the better part of his adult life, Mabuse’s Lyric Theatre reveal is going to be jam-packed with so many hits and memories, beyond “Burn Out”, that “we might not be able to fit it in,” he jokes.

Beyond competent and hugely applauded, the magic this musician makes is practically impossible to pigeonhole. Drummer, flautist, alto flautist, pianist, saxophonist, kalimba player, timbale and African drummer, Mabuse’s raw ability and talent know no limit!

His name became synonymous with township jive nearly three decades ago, and today his live performances still present the master’s art as the stuff of legend.

As the musical ambassador for South Africa, performing in virtually every country in Africa and touring the US, England, France, Germany and Italy, amongst many more, Mabuse’s recorded and produced the likes of Miriam Makeba, Hugh Masekela, Ray Phiri and Sibongile Khumalo.

Head out to The Lyric Theatre, at Gold Reef City, and come celebrate the multiple anniversaries with his friends, peers and contemporaries. Expect tributes, tears and Timelessness aplenty as Sipho”Hotstix” Mabuse unpacks, retells and delights the night with songs that remain as perpetual as the master maker himself.

Tickets are available from Computicket.co.za or call: 0861 915 8000 or click on link below 

http://online.computicket.com/web/event/sipho_hotstix_mabuse_timelessness/846750980/referer:-highlights-index-0-1_1_19766141-0-grid-

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For more information contact:
Triple M Entertainment
Martin Myers
E-mail: martin@triplementertainment.co.za
Mobile: +27 83 448 4475

The 100 greatest South African songs | TimesLive

From TimesLive

Abdullah Ibrahim - image: Sunday Times

Abdullah Ibrahim – image: Sunday Times

The full 100

Here they are, in chronological order, chosen by a 20-strong panel of LS writers using three criteria: 1) musical brilliance; 2) popular success; 3) impact on the national mind. Some tracks aced one category and flunked the other two, but plenty ticked all three boxes. Which immortal hits have we missed? Tune us the odds at lifestyle@sundaytimes.co.za

1. Phalafala Dolly Rathebe and the Elite Swingsters (1964)

2. Pata Pata Miriam Makeba (written in 1957 with Dorothy Masuka, but a global hit in 1967)

3. Master Jack Four Jacks And A Jill (1968)

4. Yakhal’ Inkomo Winston “Mankunku” Ngozi (1968)

5. For your Precious Love The Flames (1968)

6. The Seagull’s Name Was Nelson Des and Dawn Lindberg (1971)

7. Nomathemba Letta Mbulu (1973)

8. Mama Tembu’s Wedding Margaret Singana (1973)

9. Stimela Hugh Masekela (1974)

10. Mannenberg Abdullah Ibrahim (1974)

11. Charlie Rabbitt (1975)

12. Blues For a Hip King Abdullah Ibrahim (1975)

13. Marabi Malombo (1976)

14. Chocolate Toffee Saitana (1976)

15. Substitute Clout (1978)

16. Universal Men Juluka (1979)

17. ZX Dan The Radio Rats (1979)

18. Jo Bangles Baxtop (1979)

19. Paradise Road Joy (1980)

20. Party Harari (1981)

21. Man on the Moon Ballyhoo (1981)

22. Impi Juluka (1981)

23. The Bushman Steve Kekana (1982)

24. Isiphiwo Soul Brothers (1982)

25. Hey Boy Via Afrika (1983)

26. Shadows éVoid (1983)

27. Weekend Special Brenda Fassie (1983)

28. Shot Down The Cherry Faced Lurchers (1983)

29. See Yourself (Clowns) Ella Mental (1984)

30. Burnout Sipho “Hotstix” Mabuse (1984)

31. Is it an Ism or is it Art? Niki Daly (1984)

32. Jabulani Hotline featuring PJ Powers (1984)

33. I’m in Love with a DJ Yvonne Chaka Chaka (1985)

34. Stimela sazeZola – Mbongeni Ngema (1985)

35. Reggae Vibes is Cool Bernoldus Niemand (1985)

36. This Boy Sweatband (1986)

37. National Madness The Aeroplanes (1986)

38. Change is Pain Mzwakhe Mbuli (1986)

39. Homeless Ladysmith Black Mambazo (1986)

40. Johnny Calls the Chemist Falling Mirror (1986)

41. Now or Never Sankomota (1987)

42. Ten Ten Special African Jazz Pioneers (1987)

43. Scatterlings of Africa Johnny Clegg and Savuka (1987)

44. Weeping Bright Blue (1987)

45. Hillbrow Johannes Kerkorrel (1988)

46. Quick Quick Marcalex (1989)

47. Slave Lucky Dube (1990)

48. Shake Tananas (1990)

49. Special Star Mango Groove (1990)

50. Tomorrow Nation O’Yaba (1991)

51. I’m in Love with a Rastaman Mahlathini and the Mahotella Queens (1991)

52. Sarafina! Hugh Masekela (1992)

53. It’s About Time Boom Shaka (1993)

54. The Crossing Johnny Clegg (1993)

55. Mmalo-We Bayete (1994)

56. Never Again Prophets of Da City (1994)

57. When You Come Back Vusi Mahlasela (1994)

58. Waar Was Jy? Skeem (1994)

59. Sea Level Urban Creep (1995)

60. The Child Inside Qkumba Zoo (1995)

61. Kaffir Arthur Mafokate (1995)

62. African Dream Vicky Sampson (1996)

63. Kiss the Machine Battery 9 (1996)

64. Magasman Trompies (1997)

65. Stand in your Way Just Jinger (1997)

66. Fords Nissans Toys en Beetles Brasse vannie Kaap (1997)

67. Shibobo TKZee (1998)

68. Vul’indlela Brenda Fassie (1998)

69. Yehlisan’ Umoya Busi Mhlongo (1998)

70. Sondela Ringo Madlingozi (1999)

71. Thathi Sgubu Bongo Maffin (1999)

72. Blue Eyes Springbok Nude Girls (1999)

73. Genes & Spirits Moses Molelekwa (2000)

74. Born in a Taxi Blk Sonshine (2000)

75. Nkalakatha Mandoza (2000)

76. Afrikaners is Plesierig Karen Zoid (2001)

77. Meisie Meisie Kurt Darren (2001)

78. Ghetto Fabulous Zola & Kaybee (2002)

79. Ndihamba Nawe Mafikizolo (2002)

80. Ayelekile Amasango Ismael (2002)

81. Picture Perfect Perez (2002)

82. Midnight 340ml (2003)

83. Umoya Skwatta Kamp (2003)

84. Nomvula (After the Rain) Freshlyground 2003

85. Destiny Malaika (2004)

86. Nizalwa Ngobani Thandiswa Mazwai (2004)

87. Matofotofo Pitch Black Afro (2004)

88. Akekh’ uGogo Mzekezeke (2005)

89. Whistling in Tongues Felix Laband (2005)

90. De La Rey Bok van Blerk (2006)

91. Sister Bethina Mgarimbe (2006)

92. Feel Good Lira (2007)

93. Bantu Biko Street Simphiwe Dana (2007)

94. Show Dem (Make the Circle Bigger) JR feat Hip-Hop Pantsula (2009)

95. Cooler as Ekke Jack Parow (2010)

96. Enter the Ninja Die Antwoord (2010)

97. Fairytale Liquideep (2010)

98. Tot Die Son Uitkom Van Coke Cartel (2011)

99. Loliwe Zahara (2011)

100. Hosanna The Brother Moves on (2013)

Singing the praises of South African popular-music legends | South African Post Office Stamp Programme 2014

From South African Post Office

South African Music Legends

“Music can change the world because it can change people,”said well-know Irish singer-songwriter and musician, Bono. This is especially true in Africa, where music is an integral part of everyday life. South Africa with its melting pot of cultures has produced a rich crop of highly talented popular-music legends, whose music has changed people’s perceptions. In honour of some of these musicians, the South African Post Office will issue a set 10 self-adhesive stamps and two commemorative envelopes on 3 July, featuring artwork by Vumile Mavumengwana.

Other famous people have also sung the praises of the power of music, notably Shakespeare who wrote: “If music be the food of love, play on…”. But more applicable in the South African context, are the words of Hans Christian Andersen: “Where words fail, music speaks.” The music of South African musicians have indeed spoken to scores of people across the board – our cities, townships, rural areas, sports stadiums and marketplaces are infused and alive with music.

The popular-music legends featured on these stamps were chosen for their innovative music, which brought fundamental change to the perceptions of South Africans and was instrumental in uniting societies. Criteria used in choosing them also included factors such as whether they introduced a completely new, original and distinctively South African style of music.

The musicians are as representative as possible of our society, covering the most important or best-known musical genres, which achieved international success.

James Phillips: 1959-1995

Also known as Bernoldus Niemand. In the musical genre Counter Cultural, Phillips represents a leading influence on the Voëlvry alternative, Afrikaans rock renaissance movement and its impact on South African anti-apartheid protest music. Alongside Koos Kombuis, Valiant Swart, Willem Möller and Johannes Kerkorrel, he was a “cultural icon, voice and conscience to a generation of apartheid-era white South Africans.”

Brenda Fassie: 1964-2004

In the musical genre Afropop, Fassie was one of the most popular urban African musicians of the 1980s and 1990s. She has been described as the “Queen of African Pop” and her bold stage antics earned her a reputation for “outrageousness”. Affectionately called Mabrr by her fans, she was voted 17th on the list of Top 100 Great South Africans.

Johannes Kerkorrel: 1960-2002

Born Ralph Rabie, Kerkorrel was a prolific singer-songwriter in the musical genre Alternative Afrikaans/Voëlvry movement. Described as “one of the leading lights of the rebel Voëlvry movement that blew a new wind across the Afrikaans music scene in the early 1980s”, he exposed a new generation of Afrikaners to political views resisting apartheid. Several artists have recorded tribute songs to his life and work.

Lucky Dube: 1963-2007

As an icon of South African Reggae, Dube pioneered and popularised this genre, which conveyed the Rastafarian philosophy, among township youth. He still influences younger musicians pursuing this style. Dube recorded 22 albums in Zulu, English and Afrikaans in a 25-year period and was South Africa’s biggest-selling Reggae artist. He earned over 20 awards – locally and internationally.

Miriam Makeba: 1932-2008

Makeba, a legend in the musical genre World Music and Mbaqanga, is the most famous South African musician both locally and internationally. Nicknamed Mama Africa, Makeba is a Grammy Award-winner, a civil rights activist and a global icon for women. In the 1960s, she was the first artist from Africa to popularise African music worldwide. In 1987, she performed with Paul Simon in his famous Graceland tour.

Solomon Linda: 1909-1962

Linda, was a musician, singer, composer and innovator of note regarding developing the Isicathimiya musical genre and is credited with a number of musical innovations that came to dominate the Isicathamiya style. He wrote the song Mbube, which later became popular as The Lion Sleeps Tonight, and gave its name to the Mbube style of Isicathamiya a cappella popularised later by Ladysmith Black Mambazo.

Spokes Mashiyane: 1933-1972

Johannes Spokes Mashiyane was regarded as one of the greatest pennywhistle artists who graced the South African Kwêla music scene in the 1950s and 1960s, at a time when that genre was one of the defining styles and the dominant dance music in the country. He later switched to saxophone and was instrumental in Kwêla’s evolution into township jive. He has a strong following to this day.

Simon Nkabinde: 1935-1999

Simon ‘Mahlathini’ Nkabinde is a legendary Mbaqanga singer, a genre of indigenous music that continues to influence musicians worldwide today. Known as the “Lion of Soweto”, Nkabinde is the acknowledged exponent of the deep-voiced, basso profundo style that came to symbolise Mbaqanga music from the mid-60s to the mid-70s. He collaborated on Paul Simon’s groundbreaking Graceland album and tour.

Kippie Moeketsi: 1925-1983

One of South Africa’s greatest Jazz musicians, Moeketsi first played the clarinet, but soon moved on to the saxophone. Influenced by his pianist brother Jacob Moeketsi, Kippie’s career started in shebeens with Band in Blue. He was the driving force in the Jazz Epistles alongside Abdullah Ibrahim, Hugh Masekela, Jonas Gwangwa and Makhaya Ntshoko who recorded the first authentic South African Jazz album.

Taliep Petersen: 1950-2006

Taliep Petersen, was a legendary singer, composer and director, who popularised the so-called Cape Ghoema sound together with David Kramer. In a tribute after his death, he was credited with “rewriting the musical landscape of the Western Cape and enriching the culture of this country.”  He has been awarded  a Lifetime Achievement Award, as well as a Naledi for Best Musical Director/Score/Arrangement for Ghoema.

The 10 best … record stores | City Press

From City Press

The old art of record collecting is still alive as independent record shops crop up across SA despite the growth of online music sales. Percy Mabandu lists 10 of his best

Mabu Vinyl
1 Mabu Vinyl
This tune emporium was established in 2001 by Jacques Vosloo, who now co-owns it with Stephen Segerman. The store was memorialised in the
Oscar-winning documentary Searching for Sugarman
in which it featured extensively. It stocks a rare selection of classics with a catalogue including second-hand records, books, comics, CDs, DVDs and cassettes. The average price of a record is R80 and the store is open seven days a week.
2 Rheede Street, Gardens, Cape Town
mabuvinyl.co.za

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