South African Rock History: African Daze – Progressive Rock

Two mixes of Progressive Rock tracks from South African Rock History, compiled by Brian Currin.

Artists featured include Freedoms Children, Abstract Truth, Hawk, Otis Waygood, Duncan Mackay, McCully Workshop and Third Eye.

More info on all these artists (and many more) at The South African Rock Encyclopedia

African Daze – South African Prog Rock

Track List

1 A Madman’s Cry by Otis Waygood
2 Blue Wednesday Speaks by Abstract Truth
3 Eclipse by Freedoms Children
4 Astral III by Invaders
5 (We All) Look For The Sun by McCully Workshop
6 Sea Horse by Freedoms Children
7 The Whip by Suck
8 African Day (excerpt) by Hawk
9 Retain Your Half-Ticket by Third Eye
10 Morpheus (excerpt) by Duncan Mackay
11 Tribal Fence by Freedoms Children
12 Orang Otang by Harambee
13 In Spite Of It All by Circus
14 Desert (excerpt) by Steve Linnegar’s Snakeshed


African Daze Vol 2 – More South African Prog Rock

Track List

1 The Crazy World Of Pod: electronic concerto by Freedoms Children
2 2001 Space Odyssey (Deodato cover) by McCully Workshop
3 21st Century Schizoid Man (King Crimson cover) by Suck
4 Medals Of Bravery by Freedoms Children
5 Judas by David’s Confession
6 Pharaoh’s Tomb by Titus
7 Mumbo Jumbo by Ramsay Mackay
8 Silver Trees by Abstract Truth
9 Slowly Towards The North (Freedoms Children cover) by Jack Hammer
10 Orang Otang by Hawk
11 The Bridge by Julian Laxton
12 Useless Illusions (based on Nights In White Satin) by The Flames
13 Caterpillar by The Third Eye
14 Sirius II by Duncan Mackay
15 In The Sun by Otis Waygood
16 Avenue by McCully Workshop
17 Silent Water by Ramsay Mackay
18 Hunter by Hawk
19 I Need You by The Invaders
20 I Left My Skull In San Francisco by Otis Waygood
21 Apricot Brandy (Rhinoceros cover) by The Third Eye
22 In A Space by Abstract Truth
23 Season Of The Witch (incl drum solo) (Donovan cover) by Suck


More information at the The South African Rock Encyclopedia

More South African music mixes at SA Rock Digest on Mixcloud

Hammerhead Hotel, feat Falling Mirror, Jack Hammer, The Dolly Rockers, McCully Workshop, Radio Rats

Hammerhead Hotel | photo: Michael Currin
Hammerhead Hotel | photo: Michael Currin


Track List

1. Bus Station – Fly Paper Jet
2. Hammerhead Hotel – Falling Mirror
3. Alison – Dolly Rockers
4. Getting Better – Scabby Annie
5. Shock Time For Rock – The Popguns
6. Morrison Hotel – Jack Hammer
7. Werewolf In The House – Falling Mirror
8. Kamikasi – McCully Workshop
9. Mucking About In The Dungeons All Day – Radio Rats
10. Monster From The Bog – Psycho Reptiles
11. Bellville Rock City – New World Inside
12. Psycho Bitch – Toxic Shame
13. Boxstar Kitty – Three Bored White Guys
14. Blue Eyed Devil – Th’ Damned Crows
15. Psycho-Babble – Lancaster Band
16. Britney Spears – Tweak
17. Babydoll Blues – The Ragdolls
18. Psycho – Them Tornados
19. Woo Hoo! – Fire Through The Window
20. Baby Girl You’re Gonna Burn! – Peachy Keen
21. Drakilla – The Psykotix
22. Surfin’ With The Goth Gang – Martin Rocka And The Sick Shop
23. Krokodil – Retro Dizzy
24. Buccaneer – Moyawetu
25. Beethoven Is Dying – Koos Kombuis En Die Warmblankes
26. Only Yesterday – Sharkbrother
27. Boomtown Hotel – Valiant Swart
28. Kitchener – Piet Botha
29. Praha Paradise (2007 version) – Ernestine Deane feat Tim Parr
30. Die Gipsy In Jou Oë – Anna Davel
31. Farewell To Gypsy – Bonekey

Vagabond Blues Show on All Jazz Radio every Thursday afternoon

Join me on my Vagabond Blues show on www.AllJazzRadio.co.za every Thursday afternoon from 4pm to 6pm (SA time). I play a broad spectrum of music in the blues genre, with a special focus on South African blues. – Brian Currin

Extract from an article I wrote in February 2007

I was born in South Africa 4 days after “The Day The Music Died” according to Don McLean (you work it out!). I was born and bred in a home filled with music (mainly Church Hymns and Showtunes) but soon discovered in my pre-teen years that I had absolutely no talent for singing or playing an instrument. I do play a mean air guitar solo though – I usually play a Black Fender Stratocaster Original Air Guitar. I also play Air Organ – a Hammond B3 of course – and recently I’ve started learning to play Air Harmonica.

Since I had this overwhelming passion for music, but not the skills to perform it, I started collecting music as well as information about music and also statistics and lists. Finding musical information in Apartheid-era South Africa was difficult to say the least, but my passion knew no bounds and I persevered.

In 1973 I heard the ‘Made in Japan’ version of ‘Smoke Of The Water’ by Deep Purple and my fate as a Rock Fan was sealed. I always thought that when I grew up I would lose my love of Rock and get into Classical and Jazz as “older” people did. Never happened! What did happen is that I just added and added more styles, types and genres to my musical tastes, though Classic Rock is still my first love and Deep Purple is still my favourite group. After listening to Purple and Zeppelin and Tull and Clapton and such-like I wanted to hear the original blues that inspired them … and a whole new world of discovering the Blues masters opened up for me.

Blues From The Deep South (Of Africa)

Because of South Africa’s unique geographical position and cosmopolitan population, there is really no such thing as a single defining style of “South African Music”. We seem to have everything here on the Southern Tip of Africa including African Tribal music, Zulu Township Jazz, Country and Western, Death Metal, Electronica and so much more, all with their own clearly-defined (and sometimes overlapping) niche markets. However the blues seems to be very popular in South Africa amongst most population groups, though I’ve never seen any research to support this theory of mine.

Blues in South Africa includes a wide variety of genres including Jazz Blues, Folk Blues, Traditional Blues, Blues Rock, Acoustic Blues and even blues sung in the language of Afrikaans which for want of a better name we will call Afrikaans Blues. So really South African Blues is just a term to mean Blues played by South African musicians. Cover versions of old blues classics abound, but there are also a large number of original compositions written in a variety of blues styles. Very few South African Blues musicians actually concentrate on playing the Blues exclusively, but rather play a mix of Blues, Rock, Blues-Rock and Country Rock.

Join me on my Vagabond Blues show on www.AllJazzRadio.co.za every Thursday afternoon from 4pm to 6pm (SA time). I play a broad spectrum of music in the blues genre, with a special focus on South African blues. – Brian Currin

Martin Raphael and Ramases are not the same person | Space Hymns

Ramases and Sel on Felixstowe beach, 1975
Ramases and Sel, 1975. Photo: Pennie Smith (NME)

It was reported by many reviewers and re-issue liner note writers that the real name of the artist known as Ramases (who recorded the cult classic album Space Hymns in 1971) was Martin Raphael.

However in May 2012, Dorothy, better known to Ramases fans as Sel (or Selket), advised that her late husband, Ramases (real name Barrington Frost) and Martin Raphael were not the same person.

I would like to clear up the confusion between Ramases (Barrington Frost), born in Sheffield, and Martin Raphael who played the sitar on Space Hymns. I do not know where he was born or where he lived. I wish to confirm that Ramases and Martin Raphael were not the same person. I do not know how this misunderstanding has come about. I would be interested to hear any comments. Love and light from Selket. (Dorothy Frost, wife of Ramases)

Dorothy’s message was posted on the Space Hymns website and Facebook Page, and actor and musician, Peter Stormare responded with some information after listening to the studio out-take tapes.

Martin Raphael’s nickname was Ralph to start with….
On one of the out-takes the engineer… (Gouldman, I think) talks over the intercom to the guy on the floor … you think it’s to Ram but actually Ram isn’t even there … it’s an overdub… (track is obviously Molecular Delusion, Mr Raphael’s only contribution).

“Hey Ralph” And it sounds as if Ram is replying, but that’s a previous take…
It’s very clear on our out-take…
“Ralph” Martin Raphael is then the only one talking…
Ram did show and sing him the chord-changes, but when the sitar is laid down on the next take Ram has left.

Also the famous “Fuck” heard on Molecular Delusions is clearly not Ram but Martin Raphael … he thought the chorus was coming and plays that note but there is still 8 bars of verse to go … he goes back to the verse after a bar.

‘Searching For Sugar Man’ Wins Two Awards At Sundance Film Festival | PT Music

Press release for PT Music

Searching For Sugarman
Searching For Sugarman

In 2006 Swedish film producer Malik Bendjelloul visited Cape Town, South Africa as part of a world-spanning journey searching for inspiration for a new film. What he found was a story that was so unbelievable that if a scriptwriter had written it as a piece of fiction, it would have been rejected as being too far-fetched.

‘Searching For Sugar Man’ took three years to complete and was filmed in Cape Town and Detroit, and other South African and US locations. The film had its international premiere on Thursday 19th January 2012, at the Sundance Film Festival held in Park City, Utah, USA as a representative of the World Documentary section.

Synopsis from Sundance Filmguide:

“Rodriguez was the greatest ’70s U.S. rock icon who never was. His albums [Cold Fact and Coming From Reality] were critically well-received, but sales bombed, and he faded away into obscurity among rumors of a gruesome death. However, as fate would have it, a bootleg copy of his record made its way to South Africa, where his music became a phenomenal success. In a country suppressed by apartheid, his anti-establishment message connected with the people.

When his second album finally gets released on CD in South Africa, two fans take it as a sign, deciding to look into the mystery of how Rodriguez died and what happened to all of the profits from his album sales. Since very little information about the singer exists, they meet many obstacles until they uncover a shocking revelation that sets off a wild chain of events that has to be seen to be believed. ‘Searching For Sugar Man’ is a story of hope, inspiration, and the resonating power of music”.

After the initial screening, Chris Lee from the Daily Beast wrote: “Following the rise, seeming demise, and re-emergence of an obscure but influential Mexican-American folk singer named Rodriguez, the movie premiered Thursday to tears, cheers, and a standing ovation from festival attendees”.

‘Searching For Sugar Man’ garnered two awards, The ‘World Cinema Audience Award: Documentary’ and ‘World Cinema Documentary Special Jury Prize for its Celebration of the Artistic Spirit’. To receive both an audience award and a critics award is a very rare occurrence indeed and had only happened once before since Sundance was founded in 1981 by Robert Redford. It was also one the first films sold at the Festival, being snapped up by Sony Pictures Classics.

Rodriguez (who turns 70 this year in July) attended the festival and appeared with Malik Bendjelloul and Sugarman.org’s Stephen “Sugar” Segerman, after every screening. He also performed at the packed-out Sundance ASCAP Music Café. (see video below)

The Sundance Film Festival success of ‘Searching For Sugarman’ is another milestone in the strange and wonderful story of the man known, to his ever increasing fan base around the world, simply as Rodriguez.

Brian Currin
Sugarman.org

Sundance Press Release
http://press.sundance.org/38362?format=pdf&press=1

Sundance Filmguide
http://filmguide.sundance.org/film/120073/searching_for_sugar_man

Sundance ASCAP Music Café

50 Original South African Songs

A non-definitive list of 50 great South African songs, that are not cover versions of overseas hits.

Arranged in chronological order of release date.

1. Vuka Vuka The Manhattan Brothers
2. Meadowlands Archie Coker & The Meteors
3. Ag Pleez Deddy (aka The Ballad Of The Southern Suburbs) (live 1962) Jeremy Taylor
4. Pata Pata Miriam Makeba
5. Silence Is Golden The Square Set
6. Master Jack 4 Jacks & A Jill
7. I Need Someone Alan Garrity
8. Orang Otang Hawk
9. Charlie Rabbitt
10. Playgrounds In Paradise Finch & Henson
11. Johannesburg The Julian Laxton Band
12. Buccaneer McCully Workshop
13. Villagers Theme (from TV series) Mick Jade
14. You’re Living Inside My Head John Ireland
15. ZX Dan Radio Rats
16. Boy Van Die Suburbs Anton Goosen
17. Better The Devil You Know Stingray
18. Man On The Moon Ballyhoo
19. Paradise Road Joy
20. Roxy Lady Neill Solomon
21. Schoolboy Asylum Kids
22. You’re So Good To Me Hotline feat PJ Powers
23. Bowtie Boogaloo Morocko
24. Give Me The Good News Crocodile Harris
25. Shadows éVoid
26. See Yourself (Clowns) Ella Mental
27. Jabulani PJ Powers & Hotline
28. Baby You Been Good Robin Auld
29. Burn Out Sipho ‘Hotstix’ Mabuse
30. Johnny Calls The Chemist Falling Mirror
31. We Are Growing Margaret Singana & Julian Laxton
32. This Boy Sweatband
33. Weeping Bright Blue
34. Scatterlings Of Africa Johnny Clegg & Savuka
35. Be Bop Pop The Spectres
36. Hometalk Mango Groove
37. Shosholoza Ladysmith Black Mambazo with The Team
38. Afrikan Dream Vicky Sampson
39. Sarajevo Jack Hammer
40. Shallow Waters Just Jinger
41. Who Killed Kurt Cobain Koos Kombuis
42. Goeienag Generaal Piet Botha
43. Die Mystic Boer Valiant Swart
44. Un-Ez Springbok Nude Girls
45. Nkalakatha Mandoza
46. I’ll Remember You Brian Finch
47. Gasoline Saron Gas
48. Africa’s Not For Sissies Syd Kitchen
49. Another Universe Arno Carstens
50. Doo Be Doo Freshly Ground

Rock Memories: 70s Acoustic Rock

As a teenager in the 70’s I compiled cassette tapes of my favourite songs. Much later on I compiled CD-Rs, and even later iTunes playlists on my computer.

And now YouTube videos on a WordPress blog.

So I am still doing the same thing I always loved, making my own compilations, just the technology has changed.

And the music still has the power to move me.

Eleven Of The Best Classic Rock Songs Released in 2011

2011 has been a great year for an old Classic Rock fan like myself.

My sons: “what did you call “Classic Rock” when you were growing up, Dad?”

Me: “Rock!

Some of my all-time favourite bands either released new albums or re-issued classic albums with obscure and rare bonus tracks during 2011.

Here are eleven tracks that stand-out:

  1. Wond’ring Aloud, Again – Jethro Tull
    Segued and extended version,
    from the 40th Anniversary re-issue of  “Aqualung
  2. The Painter (BBC, version two) – Deep Purple
    from “BBC Sessions
  3. Gotta Be Crazy (live 1974) – Pink Floyd
    early version of Dogs,
    from the 2011 re-issue of “Wish You Were Here
  4. Into The Storm – Yes
    from “Fly From Here”
  5. The Travel Sequence – Pink Floyd
    early version of On The Run,
    from 2011 re-issue of “Dark Side Of The Moon
  6. The Hard Way – Pink Floyd
    from The Household Objects Project,
    from 2011 re-issue of “Dark Side Of The Moon
  7. I Can See You – Uriah Heep
    from “Into The Wild”
  8. Ricochet (BBC) – Deep Purple
    early version of Speed King with different lyrics, including a guitar solo later used in The Mule,
    from “BBC Sessions”
  9. My God – Jethro Tull
    early version with slightly different lyrics,
    from the 40th Anniversary re-issue of “Aqualung
  10. Smoke On The Water (live 2011) – Deep Purple and Orchestra
    from “Live At Montreux 2011
  11. Wish You Were Here – Pink Floyd
    alternate version with Stéphane Grappelli on violin,
    from the 2011 re-issue of “Wish You Were Here

South African Music – MP3

Gary Johnston wrote:

Greetings Brian, I am a fan of SA music, particularly 60’s & 70’s. Over the years I have collected a lot of MP3’s but am still missing some classics i.e
The Staccatos
Billy Forrest
The Peanut Butter Conspiracy
The Gonks
The Dealians
Omega Limited
Bernie Brown
Neville Whitmill
The A-Cads

I would dearly love to obtain the music above and have no problem about purchasing these MP3’s but would like you to advise me how I can do this? Please help!
Thanks
Gary

Brian wrote:

Most of this music is very hard to find on CD and even more difficult as legal MP3 downloads.

Original vinyl albums can often be found at Mabu Vinyl.

More info on most of these artists can be found on the SA Rock Encyclopedia website:

60’s http://rock.co.za/files/sarock_legends_60s.html

and

70’s http://rock.co.za/files/sarock_legends_70s.html

LM Radio Top Hits Of 1973

Music Fan, Anton van Staden, has scanned this booklet issued by LM Radio reflecting their top hits of 1973.

The back cover was dedicated to an advert for a famous cigarette brand, but since I am not sure of the legalities of advertising tobacco products, I decided to omit it.

LM Radio Top Hits Of 1973

Extracts below are taken from sleeve notes for the Hits Of LM Radio 2CD set released by PT Music in 2009.

Do you remember a time in South Africa when there was no TV and no internet? Hard to believe that there ever was such a time, and that listening to the radio was actually one of the best ways to discover the latest and greatest music. The DJ’s cared about the music and they even had theme tunes. Springbok Radio was OK, but the station that teenagers really embraced with enthusiasm was LM Radio, based out of Lourenco Marques in neighbouring Mozambique.

LM Radio was privately owned and operated, and served a vast audience of young people by transmitting pop and rock music which was not heard on the state-controlled SABC stations. The music was everything and DJs like David Gresham, Darryl Jooste, Long John Berks, Peter De Nobrega (and many, many more), were real personalities who played music that they really liked and the fans appreciated it.

The radio station in Lourenco Marques first started broadcasting in the 1930s, but it was in the late 1950s that it underwent a major format change to cater for the younger generation.

The LMRadio.org website says it best; “LM Radio, as it was popularly known, was renowned for its Top Twenty chart show, the LM Hit Parade, and played a major role in promoting South African artists and their music.”

In 1975 LM Radio became Radio 5, and then 5FM, but the spark of independence was no longer there and whole generations have grown up in South Africa without hearing music radio at its best.  – Brian Currin

LM Radio Top Hits Of 1973
LM Radio Top Hits Of 1973LM Radio Top Hits Of 1973LM Radio Top Hits Of 1973LM Radio Top Hits Of 1973

John Ireland

Name: Keith Millar

Message: Hi Brian – We have been searching for 25 odd years for the John Ireland Thinking Aloud and John Ireland albums!!

Then I stumbled across your site quite by chance – fantastic website!!!!

Brian do you know where I can buy these two albums – We named my daughter Nicole after the one song and she is 21 and has never heard it!!!!!

I would really appreciate your help

Warm regards

Keith

Brian wrote:

John Ireland albums have not been released on CD, but old records can be found at shops such as Mabu Vinyl in Cape Town.

He was born John Griffith on the 24th August 1954 in Ireland (some sources say Boksburg). He attended Boksburg High School in the mid-70s. In 1977 he and Jonathan Handley formed the band Slither and were based in Springs. He studied medicine with Jonathan at Wits University and they both became doctors. Slither later became Radio Rats. John has musical training in classical piano to an advanced level and also plays guitar and drums. – SA Rock Encyclopedia

Joanna Field "Don't Fly Too High"

Name: JADE HURLEY

Message: Hello Brian … I am trying to find out who wrote the Joanna Field song “DON’T FLY TOO HIGH” … and i believe you may be able to help? If so … I would really be obliged as I have just recorded this song and require the writers details. I hope you can help. JADE HURLEY OAM … You can reference me here … Website: www.jadehurley.net

Brian wrote:

“Don’t Fly Too High” was written by J. Frankfurter and R. Jung with English lyrics by T & J Möhring. Published by Gallo / GEMA.

Originally recorded by German singer, Nicole, as “Flieg Nicht So Hoch, Mein Kleiner Freund” in 1981.

It reached number 4 on the Springbok Radio charts in 1982.

Available to download at Rhythm Music Store.

Videos:

Assistance with songs

Name: David Steeles
Message: Good-day Brian I hope you are keeping well . A big thank-you , Music fan brings back a lot of memories for one by finding lost songs .There are three songs I am desperately looking for that I caanot find no where , 2 are sung by the Tremeloes viz: Hello World and Call me number one . The other is I need someone by Joan Jett and We’re on the same Boat By Andre’ Swiegers . Then I need some assistance with regards to a recording of a piece of a song who i have no idea who sings it , I cannot even make out the lyrics , but is a golden oldie , if I could email it to that specific adress . Then lastly I am urgently looking for a complilation titled Future dance Classix Programme 1 , dating back to 1991 ? Your assistance would be appreciated . have agreat day kind regards David

Classic Rock Covers by South African Artists

A list of classic rock covers (and samples) by South African artists that are available to download from Rhythm Music Store; in no particular order:

Classic Rock on Rhythm

Many international acts are hard to find on Rhythm Music Store due to various licencing restrictions, however there are a number of classic rock songs that can be found.

Here is a list of some of my favourites in no particular order; please note that quite often they are live versions or updated re-recordings.

And as a bonus, take a listen to Ministry’s Cover Up album which includes covers of songs by classic rockers The Doors, Black Sabbath, Deep Purple, Golden Earring and err, Louis Armstrong.

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