Vinyl sales hit a 25-year high: John Maytham talks to Stephen “Sugar” Segerman

http://www.capetalk.co.za/articles/239026/vinyl-sales-hits-a-25-year-high

Deloitte expects double-digit growth in the sales of vinyl records for the seventh consecutive year, passing the $1 billion mark for the first time since the 1980s.

The professional services company expects 12-inch records to generate between 15% and 18% of all physical music sales.

According to the Entertainment Retailers Association, vinyl outsold digital downloads for the first time in December.

Consumers bought 3.2 million LPs in 2015 – a 25-year high.

John Maytham interviewed Mabu Vinyl’s Stephen Segerman.

Listen to the interview in the audio below (and/or scroll down for quotes from it).

Vinyl sales hits a 25-year high
VINYL SALES HITS A 25-YEAR HIGH
Deloitte expects double-digit growth in the sales of vinyl records for the seventh consecutive year, passing the $1 billion mark for the first time since the 1980s.

Musica has a full vinyl section now.

Stephen Segerman, Mabu Vinyl

New vinyl is a bit pricy.

Stephen Segerman, Mabu Vinyl

The market big.

Stephen Segerman, Mabu Vinyl

It’s much more expensive to buy a vinyl record than to digitally download an album.

Stephen Segerman, Mabu Vinyl

Dinosaur Days Revisited Benefit For Leon Economides

Cafe Barcelona in Pretoria is the place to be at 7pm on the 16th November to show support for Leon Economides.

 

Leon Economides and Paris.

Leon Economides and Paris.

  

A number of years ago, Leon was held up at gunpoint in an armed robbery in his offices, and was badly assaulted, which led to his spinal column being seriously injured when a few lower vertebra were broken as a result of him being kicked in the back and the assailants jumping on his back when he was made to lie face down on the floor. The damage was quite extensive, and this this has led to many failed back procedures since 2008 (the diagnosis is called “Failed Back Procedure Syndrome”) and other complications, rendering him unable to work properly or live a normal life, together with huge medical bills. This has affected his income tremendously, and has led to other medical conditions that are attributed to the condition.

 

It is a long and involved story, but to summarize: Due to medical aid and life policy exclusions / waiting periods and other financial issues, Leon’s medical expenses got out of control as the complications, and need, for further, and ongoing medical procedures, continue. He has recently consulted with a new anaesthesiologist / pain specialist at the Wilgeheuwel Hospital who has advised that, whilst there is no cure for the nerve and disc damage done, he might be able to alleviate and reduce the debilitating pain Leon is experiencing every day of his life, with a different procedure to the ones that Leon has already had, and which have not been successful, hopefully thus affording him a better quality of life.

 

Johnathan Martin came up with the idea of a benefit concert, and he and Charl Barry have set about arranging this. The purpose of the benefit concert is to try and assist Leon with the costs of this latest procedure, which is to be held in the later part of November.

 

Johnathan and Charl contacted various musicians, secured a venue and a PA, together with a sound engineer. It’s now its up to us, the public, to show up and help pay Leon’s medical bills, a sort of “thank you” for the music and support of SA bands and musicians over the years.

 

CAFE BARCELONA, in Elardus Park, Pretoria, was kind enough to give us the venue, together with their PA. The concert will be held from 7pm on 16 NOVEMBER 2013, and Conrad Jamneck will do the sound. 

 

The musicians that so kindly offered their services for free, are:

 

  • Son
  • The Fake Leather Blues Band
  • Aiden Martin Band
  • Agro
  • Johnathan Martin and In My Blood
  • The Black Cat Bones
  • Mauritz Lotz

 

ALSO…..

 

Peter Pulvenis from BAND O’ GYPSYS will come out of retirement for this gig, thanks to Gary Fulton.

 

The entrance fee will be R100 per person. The money will be paid into a fund which will be used to pay for Leon’s medical bills.

 

Cafe Barcelona 

Elardus Park Shopping Centre,

cnr Delmas & Barnard Streets,

Elardus Park,

Pretoria

phone: 012 – 345 3602

email: info@cafebarcelona.co.za

Visit the Facebook Page at https://www.facebook.com/events/225073830992372/

 

For more information contact Johnathan Martin on noquarterband@yahoo.co.uk

SA music comes up trumps at Music Exchange 2013

South African music is entering an exciting era of opportunity and progress as new markets open up for homegrown sounds. This was one of the key messages emerging from the 2013 Music Exchange Conference, which saw industry moguls and musicians congregating at the iconic Cape Town City Hall to talk about the serious business of music.

Music Exchange 2013

Music Exchange 2013

Music Exchange 2013

Music Exchange 2013

Music Exchange 2013

Trevor Jones, Randall Abrahams

For three days, from 21 to 23 March 2013, the City Hall was abuzz with the sound of music – with a full programme of workshops and panel discussions on making it, marketing it, getting it heard on various platforms and ensuring that it moves with the times.

This independent music conference, now in its third year, attracted hundreds of experts and delegates from across the music spectrum – from composers and publishers to record company executives and media – to share knowledge and ideas, network, perform live showcases and identify opportunities to boost South African music locally, regionally and abroad.

Among the high-profile music creators spotted at the conference were Vicky Sampson, Mynie Grové, Sipho “Hotstix” Mabuse, RJ Benjamin, Chad Saaiman, Jimmy Nevis, Mark Haze, Dub Masta China and Arno Carstens, as well as industry heavyweights such as Universal Music A&R consultant Benjy Mudie, Cape Town Jazz festival founder Rashid Lombard and Rolling Stone SA editor-in-chief Miles Keylock.

The international speakers on the programme included acclaimed house music producer and remixer Charles Webster (UK), music promoter Doug Davenport (USA) and Africori CEO Yoel Kenan (France).

One of the conference’s undisputed highlights was the keynote address by Trevor Jones, moderated by Universal Records managing director Randall Abrahams. Now based in the UK, Jones was born in District Six and is considered one of the top five film score composers in the world, with several Golden Globe and BAFTA nominations as well two ASCAP Awards in the bag.

Jones has made an indelible mark on the global entertainment industry, scoring international blockbusters such as Notting Hill, The Last of the Mohicans, Mississippi Burning and The Mighty and working with the likes of U2, Sting, David Bowie, Sinead O’Connor, Britney Spears, Elvis Costello and Charlotte Church.

Jones became overcome with emotion after being given a standing ovation by delegates, who warmly welcomed him back home.

During his inspirational talk, he spoke about the importance of music education and his desire to give something back to South African music industry: “Key to South Africa’s success is hard work and building a positive perception of our country and us a nation,” he said.

Award-winning local singer, songwriter and guitarist Arno Carstens, who spoke at the conference about the song that made him famous, said it was an honour to be part of Music Exchange and it was encouraging and inspiring to see so many enthusiastic people attend and share their experiences and knowledge.

Joining Carstens on the stellar line-up of artists speaking about the song that made them famous, Vicky Sampson acknowledged songwriter Alan Lazar (formerly of Mango Groove, and now a successful composer based in Los Angeles), who wrote African Dream. “I am grateful that Alan gave me the song and did not pass me up for Mango Groove’s Claire Johnston,” Sampson quipped. She spent every minute of the conference absorbing and learning, as well as reconnecting with her mentor Benjy Mudie and her old friend RJ Benjamin.

Versatile singer, composer and teacher Benjamin, who has been invited to be a vocal coach for the upcoming season of Idols and will be composing SABC2’s new signature tune, continuously urged delegates to make use of social media platforms to reach new audiences. Benjamin stood out as one of the speakers to whom delegates were drawn and his presentations proved to be extremely popular.

After the weekend’s proceedings wrapped up, local music legend Hotstix tweeted: “What a conference; what great speakers and delegates – wow!”

Added a delighted Music Exchange founder and board member, Martin Myers: “We have been completely overwhelmed by the positive feedback we’ve received, and the animated conversations on social media platforms about the success of Music Exchange.

“Recording and performing artists, as well as composers and other industry players, have complimented the conference for being relevant, engaging and thought-provoking. There was a strong focus on the business side of music, which elevated this event above a mere talk shop: they left with useful, practical information that will undoubtedly be of immense value in their various professional ventures.”

Visit www.musicexchange.co.za to find out more about next year’s Music Exchange conference, or follow @musicexchange on Twitter.

Issued by JT Communication Solutions on Behalf of Music Exchange – www.musicexchange.co.za

Vagabond Blues Show on All Jazz Radio every Thursday afternoon

Join me on my Vagabond Blues show on www.AllJazzRadio.co.za every Thursday afternoon from 4pm to 6pm (SA time). I play a broad spectrum of music in the blues genre, with a special focus on South African blues. – Brian Currin

Extract from an article I wrote in February 2007

I was born in South Africa 4 days after “The Day The Music Died” according to Don McLean (you work it out!). I was born and bred in a home filled with music (mainly Church Hymns and Showtunes) but soon discovered in my pre-teen years that I had absolutely no talent for singing or playing an instrument. I do play a mean air guitar solo though – I usually play a Black Fender Stratocaster Original Air Guitar. I also play Air Organ – a Hammond B3 of course – and recently I’ve started learning to play Air Harmonica.

Since I had this overwhelming passion for music, but not the skills to perform it, I started collecting music as well as information about music and also statistics and lists. Finding musical information in Apartheid-era South Africa was difficult to say the least, but my passion knew no bounds and I persevered.

In 1973 I heard the ‘Made in Japan’ version of ‘Smoke Of The Water’ by Deep Purple and my fate as a Rock Fan was sealed. I always thought that when I grew up I would lose my love of Rock and get into Classical and Jazz as “older” people did. Never happened! What did happen is that I just added and added more styles, types and genres to my musical tastes, though Classic Rock is still my first love and Deep Purple is still my favourite group. After listening to Purple and Zeppelin and Tull and Clapton and such-like I wanted to hear the original blues that inspired them … and a whole new world of discovering the Blues masters opened up for me.

Blues From The Deep South (Of Africa)

Because of South Africa’s unique geographical position and cosmopolitan population, there is really no such thing as a single defining style of “South African Music”. We seem to have everything here on the Southern Tip of Africa including African Tribal music, Zulu Township Jazz, Country and Western, Death Metal, Electronica and so much more, all with their own clearly-defined (and sometimes overlapping) niche markets. However the blues seems to be very popular in South Africa amongst most population groups, though I’ve never seen any research to support this theory of mine.

Blues in South Africa includes a wide variety of genres including Jazz Blues, Folk Blues, Traditional Blues, Blues Rock, Acoustic Blues and even blues sung in the language of Afrikaans which for want of a better name we will call Afrikaans Blues. So really South African Blues is just a term to mean Blues played by South African musicians. Cover versions of old blues classics abound, but there are also a large number of original compositions written in a variety of blues styles. Very few South African Blues musicians actually concentrate on playing the Blues exclusively, but rather play a mix of Blues, Rock, Blues-Rock and Country Rock.

Join me on my Vagabond Blues show on www.AllJazzRadio.co.za every Thursday afternoon from 4pm to 6pm (SA time). I play a broad spectrum of music in the blues genre, with a special focus on South African blues. – Brian Currin

All Jazz Radio

All Jazz Radio

All Jazz Radio is in its test phase and broadcasting ”live” on the ‘net. One can “tune in” and hear a continuous broad mix of music being played currently online, right around the clock, 24/7. We would like you please visit our social media sites and pages on; Facebook at www.facebook.com/AllJazzRadio and @AllJazzRadioSA on Twitter.

Remember too to let all your friends, FB Friends and Twitter Followers know to go and Like the FB page, Follow the Twitter feed, subscribe to out daily newspaper, All Jazz Radio News at http://paper.li/AllJazzRadioSA/1342250877 and most importantly listen online via the web, on your smartphone and on your tablet.

All Jazz Radio, your key to listening pleasure online, join us today. 

Please bear with us, as our training program and broadcast schedule are being  finalised and will in due course be put into place. Enjoy the good music on All Jazz Radio.

All Jazz Radio, your essential music listening home, where Jazz Lovers of South Africa, Africa & The World meet to share in our common social interest and lifestyle on the World Wide Web

Rodriguez and his place in The Story Of Rock

Willem, Rodriguez, Brian, Sugar 1998

Willem, Rodriguez, Brian, Sugar 1998

Almost all the recent fan messages on the Sugarman.org website are from people saying they have never heard of Rodriguez before. Many even apologize for not listening to him in the 1970s.

I can’t remember when exactly I first heard ‘Cold Fact’. For me his music just always seemed to have been there. A number of the mixtapes from my teenage years show “Sugar Man”, “Rich Folks Hoax” and “I Wonder” as being from 1973/74 when I was about 14/15.

I was wrong, of course, but didn’t know that until much later.

A long time ago, I compiled a series of C90 mixtapes called The Story Of Rock, with all the information lovingly catalogued and hand-written in hard cover books.

Page 13 of Book 7 shows the track listing for “The Story Of Rock 1973 to 1974” and includes the following songs:

  • Long Train Running – The Doobie Brothers
  • We Live – Xit
  • Sugar Man – Rodriguez
  • Radar Love – Golden Earring
  • Smoke On The Water – Deep Purple
  • Sweet Home Alabama – Lynyrd Skynyrd
  • The Ballad Of Casey Deiss – Shawn Phillips
  • Rich Folks Hoax – Rodriguez
  • We’re An American Band – Grand Funk Railroad

Other artists include Led Zeppelin, The Allman Brothers Band, Yes, Focus, Chicago and more. And Rodriguez was the only one that got two entries! The next page shows “The Story Of Rock 1974 to 1976” and includes “I Wonder” alongside songs by Black Sabbath, Jethro Tull, Thin Lizzy, Rory Gallagher, Pink Floyd, Genesis, David Bowie, Frank Zappa, Uriah Heep, Nazareth and others.

Cold Fact

Cold Fact

I am finding it impossible to imagine what it must be like to not grow up listening to his music alongside all those other well-known classic rock bands. I know I never heard him on the radio, but that wasn’t that strange as a number of my “Story Of Rock” artists didn’t get much radio play any way.

But that he wasn’t famous in the rest of the world, didn’t cross my mind. When I first discovered the internet during the 1996 Festive Season, I could find information on Pink Floyd and Deep Purple, however I could find nothing on Rodriguez. And that started me on a quest, that just seems to be continuously having happy endings.

Without trying to sound too melodramatic, I would not be living the life I do now, and earning my income from doing what I love, if it was not for Rodriguez and all the sparks that he ignited.